Our Blog

4 days ago  ·  

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We encourage all users of this site to subscribe to HEART INSIGHT - free digital magazine from AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION for valuable information to multiple heart disease conditions ... See MoreSee Less

3 months ago  ·  

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3 months ago  ·  

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AGGARWAL CARDIOLOGY CLINIC ... See MoreSee Less

3 months ago  ·  

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4 months ago  ·  

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AAMC Booth and Presentation at AHA Go Red for Women Luncheon March 2nd, 2018 ... See MoreSee Less

5 months ago  ·  

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5 months ago  ·  

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6 months ago  ·  

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7 months ago  ·  

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THANK YOU FOR TRUSTING US WITH YOUR HEART HEALTH AS WE USHER IN THE NEW YEAR 2018 ... See MoreSee Less

7 months ago  ·  

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Feature on our clinic in December 2017 issue of Seven Oaks Living magazine ... See MoreSee Less

8 months ago  ·  

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9 months ago  ·  

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Thanks for Supporting American Heart Association Heart Walk 10-21-2017 ... See MoreSee Less

10 months ago  ·  

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FOR MEDICAL PROVIDERS ONLY ... See MoreSee Less

1 years ago  ·  

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1 years ago  ·  

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AAMC Booth at AHA Go Red for Women Luncheon 02-24-2017 ... See MoreSee Less

1 years ago  ·  

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Eye Opening Presentation by Dr Sanjay GuptaHow to make yourself heart attack-proof - a groundbreaking CNN Report. Please share this critical information with your family and loved ones. Dr. Sanjay Gup... ... See MoreSee Less

1 years ago  ·  

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2 years ago  ·  

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2 years ago  ·  

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The Clinic now offers fully integrated electronic medical records with ability for you to sign in and access your information from I-Pad portals throughout the office, electronic messenger reminders and e mail access of your records ... See MoreSee Less

2 years ago  ·  

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2 years ago  ·  

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AAMC Open House 11-09-2016 ... See MoreSee Less

2 years ago  ·  

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Proud to be sponsor for local AHA Heart Walk 10-22-2016 ... See MoreSee Less

2 years ago  ·  

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Atul Aggarwal MD Cardiology is proud to be sponsor for local 'Kern Practitioner Physician Assistant Association' (KNPPAA) Annual Symposium on 09-17-2016

Dr Aggarwal presented an Update on 'Advances in Cardiovascular Risk Reduction' at the Symposium
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2 years ago  ·  

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Jeanette Rodriguez just completed 3 years of working as a Medical Assistant with our office. Jeanette helps to schedule patients for procedures done in the hospital like coronary interventions. Jeanette also helps to follow patients with pacemakers and implantable defibrillators by remotely checking on these devices from patients' homes without them needing to come to the office ... See MoreSee Less

2 years ago  ·  

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AAMC Booth at Pinkfest Health Fair at Mercy Southwest Hospital 09-17-2016 ... See MoreSee Less

2 years ago  ·  

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Alexis Cervantes has been working as a Medical Assistant with this practice for 3 years. Alexis reminds patients of their upcoming appointments with the clinic, besides the daily scheduling. About 50 patients are monitored with a home PT/INR machine and Alexis along with Irma Carreno, MA helps to regulate these patients' blood thinner levels on telephone ... See MoreSee Less

2 years ago  ·  

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What happens during a heart attack? www.youtube.com/watch?v=H_VsHmoRQKkwww.facebook.com/fitfabbody www.FitFabBody.com This video shows what happens to the body when someone has a heart attack. I had to watch it for my Health ED ... ... See MoreSee Less

2 years ago  ·  

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Kassandra Rios is our cheerful and friendly Medical Assistant (MA) waiting for you at check-out. Kassandra is very outgoing and loves talking to patients of all walks of life. Kassandra has been with the practice since 2014 and went to High Desert Medical College for her certification. Just another way Atul Aggarwal MD Cardiology Clinic prides itself on having the best staff possible for your heart care! ... See MoreSee Less

2 years ago  ·  

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SUBMASSIVE PULMONARY EMBOLISM AND BILATERAL DEEP VEIN THROMBOSIS TREATED WITH ORAL ANTICOAGULATION AND INSERTION OF INFERIOR VENA CAVA FILTER (PANELS 1, 2 and 3).

Repeat SCANs 3 months later showing resolution of Pulmonary embolism and deep vein thrombosis (followed by removal of inferior vena cava filter, panel 4)
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2 years ago  ·  

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Non surgical Severe Diabetic Coronary Artery Disease Treated with Rotational Atherectomy and adjunctive Coronary Stenting ... See MoreSee Less

2 years ago  ·  

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AHA Go Red for Women Luncheon 02-26-2016 ... See MoreSee Less

2 years ago  ·  

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AAMC Booth at AHA's Go Red for Women Luncheon 02-26-2016 ... See MoreSee Less

2 years ago  ·  

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Anomalous Course of the Left Main Coronary Artery Originating From the Right Sinus of Valsalva ... See MoreSee Less

2 years ago  ·  

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Christmas and Seasons Greetings -

From Myself and Our Staff for trusting us to participate in your most valuable asset - your HEART health

Best wishes for the Holiday Season
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3 years ago  ·  

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Our New Expanded Office - Lord's Blessings ... See MoreSee Less

3 years ago  ·  

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Blood Clot in right side of heart caught in transit traveling to lung during ultrasound in a patient coming in with shortness of breath (Echocardiogram)

A pulmonary embolism is a sudden blockage in a lung artery. The cause is usually a blood clot in the leg called a deep vein thrombosis that breaks loose and travels through the bloodstream to the lung. Pulmonary embolism is a serious condition that can cause

Permanent damage to the affected lung
Low oxygen levels in your blood
Damage to other organs in your body from not getting enough oxygen
If a clot is large, or if there are many clots, pulmonary embolism can cause death.

Half the people who have pulmonary embolism have no symptoms. If you do have symptoms, they can include shortness of breath, chest pain or coughing up blood. Symptoms of a blood clot include warmth, swelling, pain, tenderness and redness of the leg. The goal of treatment is to break up clots and help keep other clots from forming.
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3 years ago  ·  

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AAMC offers full spectrum of non invasive vascular imaging. Patient below with 85-90% stenoses of left carotid artery (supplying blood to brain and can cause a stroke) identified during a routine exam by Doppler ultrasound

Your carotid arteries are two large blood vessels in your neck. They supply your brain with blood. If you have carotid artery disease, the arteries become narrow, usually because of atherosclerosis. This is the buildup of cholesterol and other material in an artery. If a blood clot sticks in the narrowed arteries, blood can't reach your brain. This is one of the causes of stroke.
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3 years ago  ·  

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Critical Proximal LAD stenosis treated with rotational atherectomy and adjunctive stenting

A rotational atherectomy is a type of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) that uses a revolving instrument to break up calcified plaque clogging a coronary artery in order to restore blood flow to the heart

Used for tough blockages, a rotational atherectomy involves navigating a catheter fitted with a Rotablator device through the site of the blockage, where it rotates at a speed of up to 140,000-150,000 rpm, gently pulverizing the blockage into tiny particles that can pass safely through the bloodstream.

A rotational atherectomy is sometimes performed with a left ventricular assist device (LVAD or IABP), which provides cardiac support in order to give the physician time to perform the procedure as planned. Rotational atherectomies are usually combined with the placement of stents.

The patient, who is only locally anesthetized, experiences the procedure as something akin to having a tooth drilled. Within a very short period of time (approximately five minutes), the patient has an improved blood flow and heart function.
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3 years ago  ·  

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Patient with persistent exertional burning chest pain masquerading as 'GERD' and reportedly normal looking nuclear (thallium) stress test. Critical proximal Left anterior descending coronary stenosis, subjecting to stenting and relief of 'GERD'

Angina is chest pain or discomfort you feel when there is not enough blood flow to your heart muscle. Your heart muscle needs the oxygen that the blood carries. Angina may feel like pressure or a squeezing pain in your chest. It may feel like indigestion. You may also feel pain in your shoulders, arms, neck, jaw, or back.

Angina is a symptom of coronary artery disease (CAD), the most common heart disease. CAD happens when a sticky substance called plaque builds up in the arteries that supply blood to the heart, reducing blood flow.

There are three types of angina:

Stable angina is the most common type. It happens when the heart is working harder than usual. Stable angina has a regular pattern. Rest and medicines usually help.
Unstable angina is the most dangerous. It does not follow a pattern and can happen without physical exertion. It does not go away with rest or medicine. It is a sign that you could have a heart attack soon.
Variant angina is rare. It happens when you are resting. Medicines can help.
Not all chest pain or discomfort is angina. If you have chest pain, you should see your health care provider.
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3 years ago  ·  

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Young patient with Syncope (passing out) and ventricular tachycardia easily identified as originating from right lower heart chamber by electrocardiogram, and treated with radio frequency current and cure ... See MoreSee Less

3 years ago  ·  

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Critical Proximal Left Anterior Descending stenosis (The Classic Widow maker lesion) discovered with high Coronary CT calcium score in a 45yr old patient with persistent shortness of breath on exertion and equivocal treadmill stress test

Percutaneous (per-ku-TA-ne-us) coronary intervention (PCI), commonly known as coronary angioplasty (AN-jee-oh-plas-tee) or simply angioplasty, is a non-surgical procedure used to open narrow or blocked coronary (heart) arteries. Percutaneous means “through the skin.” The procedure is done by inserting a thin flexible tube (catheter) through the skin in the upper thigh or arm in the artery. The procedure restores blood flow to the heart muscle.

Overview

As you age, a waxy substance called plaque (plak) can build up inside your arteries. This condition is called atherosclerosis (ath-er-o-skler-O-sis).

Atherosclerosis can affect any artery in the body. When atherosclerosis affects the coronary arteries, the condition is called coronary heart disease (CHD) or coronary artery disease.

Over time, plaque can harden or rupture (break open). Hardened plaque narrows the coronary arteries and reduces the flow of oxygen-rich blood to the heart. This can cause chest pain or discomfort called angina (an-JI-nuh or AN-juh-nuh).

If the plaque ruptures, a blood clot can form on its surface. A large blood clot can mostly or completely block blood flow through a coronary artery. This is the most common cause of a heart attack. Over time, ruptured plaque also hardens and narrows the coronary arteries.

PCI can restore blood flow to the heart. During the procedure, a thin, flexible catheter (tube) with a balloon at its tip is threaded through a blood vessel to the affected artery. Once in place, the balloon is inflated to compress the plaque against the artery wall. This restores blood flow through the artery.

Doctors may use the procedure to improve symptoms of CHD, such as angina. The procedure also can reduce heart muscle damage caused by a heart attack.

Outlook

Serious complications from PCI don't occur often. However, they can happen no matter how careful your doctor is or how well he or she does the procedure. The most common complications are discomfort and bleeding at the catheter insertion site.

Research on PCI is ongoing to make it safer and more effective and to prevent treated arteries from narrowing again.
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3 years ago  ·  

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AHA Heart Walk 10-16-2015 ... See MoreSee Less

3 years ago  ·  

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Patient with non healing venous ulcer for years, treated with endovascular RF ablation of perforator draining venous channel; leads to a very gratifying result ... See MoreSee Less

3 years ago  ·  

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3 years ago  ·  

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CALL - 1-800-QUIT NOW ... See MoreSee Less

3 years ago  ·  

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Every day, your heart beats about 100,000 times, sending 2,000 gallons of blood surging through your body. Although it’s no bigger than your fist, your heart has the mighty job of keeping blood flowing through the 60,000 miles of blood vessels that feed your organs and tissues. ... See MoreSee Less

3 years ago  ·  

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Dr. Aggarwal is an interventional cardiologist in Bakersfield, California. He is proud to be a member of the Bakersfield community and features a staff of knowledgeable medical assistants. Come see the difference today! Call 661-664-0100. ... See MoreSee Less

3 years ago  ·  

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3 years ago  ·  

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